Mezuzah-Crown & Priestly Scroll

$15.00

The mezuzah is a parchment inscribed with religious texts and attached in a case to the doorpost of a Jewish house as a sign of faith. We are pleased to make this mezuzah available for a limited time at a special price! 

ITEM#   MEZ-CRWN

SKU: MEZ-CRWN Categories: , ,

Description

A mezuzah is a parchment inscribed with religious texts and attached in a case to the doorpost of a Jewish house as a sign of faith. We are pleased to make this mezuzah available at a special price for a short time only!  

This measures 4 inches in length and is designed with a parchment scroll enclosed inside a transparent cylinder, capped on each end by a beautifully designed priestly crown and the first letter of God’s name (the letter Shin) is visible on the outside of the cylinder. On the doorposts of traditional Jewish homes and many not-so-traditional homes, you will find a mezuzah (Heb.: doorpost), because it is placed upon the doorposts of the house. The mezuzah is not, as some suppose, a good-luck charm, nor does it have any connection with the lamb’s blood placed on the doorposts in Egypt. Rather, it is a constant reminder of God’s presence and God’s mitzvot (commandment). The mitzvah to place mezuzot on the doorposts of our houses is derived from Deut. 6:4-9, a passage commonly known as the Shema (Hear, from the first word of the passage). In that passage, God commands us to keep His words constantly in our minds and in our hearts, by (among other things) writing them on the doorposts of our house. The words of the Shema are written on a tiny scroll of parchment, along with the words of a companion passage, Deut. 11:13-21. On the back of the scroll, the name of God is written. The scroll is then rolled up and placed in the case, so that the first letter of the Name (the letter Shin) is visible (or, more commonly, the letter Shin is written on the outside of the case). The case and scroll are then nailed or affixed to the right side doorpost on an angle, with a small ceremony called Chanukkat Ha-Bayit (dedication of the house – yes, this is the same word as Chanukkah, the holiday celebrating the rededication of the Temple after the Maccabean revolt against Greece). A brief blessing is recited.

The procedure is to hold the mezuzah against the spot upon which it will be affixed, then recite a blessing: Blessed are You, Lord our God, King of the Universe, Who sanctified us with His mitzvot, and commanded us to affix a mezuzah. Why is the mezuzah affixed at an angle? The rabbis could not decide whether it should be placed horizontally or vertically, so they compromised! Every time you pass through a door with a mezuzah on it, you touch the mezuzah and then kiss the fingers that touched it, expressing love and respect for God and his mitzvot and reminding yourself of the mitzvot contained within them. It is proper to remove a mezuzah when you move, and in fact, it is usually recommended. You will enjoy having this beautiful mezuzah posted on your doorpost

X